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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
that nancy -- nancy pelosi and john boehner don't do that? [applause] >> they don't really socialize. one reason that joe might work together, i knew joe and i love him. i wouldn't do anything mean to joe. so that is a lot of it. the times have changed so much. in the senate, one of the problems as they got away from regular order. you send a bill to a committee. you have an oversight hearing, you have an amendment coming u-boat, you go to the full committee and the house and then you go to conference. but they wound up getting a transportation bill. it's a combination of things. modern technology, frankly it is a 24/7 news media. it is the fact that the members leave their families back home. you can't be a good legislator two and half days a week. you have to work at it. the combination of those things, it contributed to the partisanship and the gridlock that we have now. the answer is simple. it is called leadership. men and women of goodwill, conservative liberals, republicans, and the president -- they say it is an easy and we have to get results. >> so i want to come back to that. l
boehner used a post-election conference call with rank-and-file republicans to plead for patience, to give him running room to negotiate with the president who did just win reelection. mandate or not. >> let's discuss what's going on in our "strategy session." joining us are donna brazile and alex castellanos. that bill crystal comment, go ahead, raise the taxes on the wealthy, maybe more than $250,000, maybe $1 million a year. he says, what's wrong with that? half of them voted for obama anyhow in hollywood, he makes that point. >> i think the big thing is republicans want to plant as much seed corn into the economy so it will grow. but here's how the republicans in the house are looking at this thing. i've talked with a few of them this week. this is not about a deal to raise taxes. we already have a deal to raise taxes. when these tax cuts expire, taxes will go up for everybody. what we're talking about is a deal to get some of the money back. >> but no one wants the taxes to go up for the middle tax, for people making less than $250,000 a year. everyone agrees they should have the curr
. john boehner still in the house for the time being at the treasury. the president is back in the white house and harry reid is in the senate with a few more seats. why should i believe this would end any more positively than the summer of 2011? >> because again i'm not going to try to talk to you in optimism but let's look at what's changed. you have republican leadership acknowledging for the first time in this debate in public that it's agreed to increase in revenues as part of an agreement that helps restore fiscal balance. that's a very important change. you can debate on what motivated that change, and of course it's true that approach has been a popular very substantial support among the american people. you have a much greater recognition that the economy would benefit on a carefully designed balanced agreement on fiscal reform and putting it off indefinitely is not good for the country. that's important, too. and i also think again if you listen carefully to what people are saying and what many politicians are saying with many elected representatives are saying there's a lot of
coming together, and boehner used the term "comprehensive immigration reform," and so the prospects are better than they were certainly before the election, and they look better than they had. with regards to mexico, i personally don't think there's any issue that is more important for the quality of the relationship at this point. it's one of those issues that is behind sens, whatever issue one's talking about, you know, for many in mexico, not just u.s. immigration policy annoying and irritating, but offensive, the fence, the walling in, the way imgrants, largely mexican communities are talked about, and this would, if there is a policy shift in any major way, i think, would have an important impact. more as important, however, i think if one looks at the immigration issue, and i'm not going to go into details now, but it's also an economic issue. i mean, immigration and manuel will probably talk a little about that as well, but in other words, just the fact is that if you can bring 6 million mexicans out of the shadows and pried some legal status to them, they should earn more mo
week. host: "the baltimore sun" has a story, "boehner ways next moves." this is from "the wall street journal." "post office hint of gop path." host: "she fit a profile." so, more on leadership, which both sides will be voting for this week when they return to washington on who will be their leaders. so, we will continue to watch that story for u.s. well. part of the mix to avoid the fiscal cliff is these jobless benefits. that is the headline in the politics and policy section of "the washington post." "over 2 million americans could lose their jobless benefits before the end of the year." host: susan, michigan, what do you think? should we cut medicare and social security? caller: absolutely not. absolutely not. host: why not? caller: i am a woman who has finally reached the age of social security. all the years the work, this money was taken out of my paycheck. i was told from a very young age that when i reached a fine age of the period where you retire and you can get social security, that all the money that i paid in would be refunded to me. this money is not to be touched, not
for governor romney, i worked for john boehner. i called up our didge cal -- digital guy and said tell me about twitter and he said you don't need to know that. that is not going to take off. so much of what we did was driven from the bottom up through twitter. even when toivens plane, we would go -- even when i was on the plane, jen was on a much bigger plane called air force 1. i was on hairforce 1. by the time i came back to the front of the plane i would see on twitter i already made news. >> when you say people, you don't mean people. you mean reporters. >> or people. [laughter] >>that was on the -- free to be you and me c.d. reporters are people. but this was kind of backstage conversation you were watching play out on twitter. sometimes real people. it was more important for you how the journalists were using twitter. >> it became an incredible newsing a gator. you could see now like t.p.m. more left leaning. see what they are saying. see what folks on the right are saying. folks in the middle are supposed to be saying. what the outside groups are saying and you sort of got a good snapsh
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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